CLINICAL TRIALS

Clinicians are using SurgVision platform technology for running clinical trials in various disease areas (see table below). SurgVision is happy to support your research or clinical trial with an unmatched optical imaging technology, custom designed to your needs. If you are interested please contact SurgVision at +31857600425 or via email at info@surgvision.com.

Indication

Purpose of the study

as described in the referenced database

Study reference

Breast cancer

The purpose of this study is to determine the uptake, (semi-)quantification and localization of the VEGF targeting fluorescent tracer bevacizumab-IDRye800CW in breast cancer tissue, surrounding healthy tissue, tumor margins and lymph nodes. This is measured in surgical specimens after a single intravenous administration of 4,5 bevacizumab-IDRye800CW, using fluorescence microscopy and macroscopy techniques. Also the safety of bevacizumab-IDRye-800CW is assessed. Another purpose is to assess the abilities of three different fluorescent signal detection systems to detect the fluorescent signal pre- and intra-operatively.

Breast cancer

Purpose of the study: A need for further investigation for fluorescence image-guided surgery in breast conserving surgery (BCS) has arisen following the results obtained from a phase I feasibility breast cancer trial (BIRDYE study: ABR NL 37479.042011; NCT01508572). The aim of this study is to define the optimal dose of the fluorescent tracer Bevacizumab-IRDye800CW for intraoperative delineation of breast cancer tissue using the improved and optimized fluorescent tracer and camera system (phase II).

Peritoneal
carcinomatosis

The objective of the proposed study is the intraoperative detection of tumor tissue of peritoneal carcinomatosis of colorectal origin by using a near-infrared fluorophore, 800CW, conjugated to bevacizumab resulting in a bevacizumab-IRDye800CW imaging compound, administered at micro dose levels (i.e. 30 nmol, or 4,5 mg).

Rectal cancer

To improve rectal cancer management, there is a need for better visualization of drug targets in rectal cancer to identify patients who might benefit from specific targeted treatments. Molecular imaging of rectal cancer associated targets is a promising technique to accommodate this need. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), which is differentially expressed in normal versus malignant colon tissue, has proven to be a valid target for molecular imaging. Fluorescent labeling of bevacizumab (a VEGF targeting humanized monoclonal antibody currently used in anti-cancer therapy) using IRDye800CW (a fluorescent dye) has potential advantages in view of safety, infrastructure, costs, stability and imaging resolution. Therefore, the fluorescent tracer bevacizumab-IRDye800CW has been developed at the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG) and was recently approved to be administered to patients in a tracer dose. To detect this tracer in vivo in patients with colorectal cancer, a newly developed flexible near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence endoscope and optoacoustic endoscope have been developed which can be used in clinical studies. Optical fluorescence imaging may support response evaluation following chemoradiotherapy and give insight which patient might benefit from anti-VEGF targeted therapy in future studies.

Malignant esophael lesions*

To improve detection of esophageal (pre)malignant lesions during surveillance endoscopy of patients at risk of developing malignancies, for example in Barrett's Esophagus (BE), there is a need for better endoscopic visualization and the ability for targeted biopsies. Optical molecular imaging of neoplasia associated biomarkers could form a promising technique to accommodate this need. It is known that the biomarker Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) is overexpressed in dysplastic and neoplastic areas in BE segments versus normal tissue and has proven to be a valid target for molecular imaging. The University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG) developed a fluorescent tracer by labeling the VEGF-targeting humanized monoclonal antibody bevacizumab, currently used in anti-cancer therapy, with the fluorescent dye IRDye800CW. We hypothesize that when bevacizumab-IRDye800CW is administered, it accumulates in VEGF expressing high grade dysplasia (HGD) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), enabling early cancer visualization using a newly developed fluorescent NIR fiber-bundle. This hypothesis will be tested in this pilot intervention study.

Adenomatous colon tissue*

There is a need for better visualization of polyps during surveillance endoscopy in patients with hereditary colon cancer syndromes like Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) and Lynch Syndrome (LS), to improve the adenoma detection rate. Optical molecular imaging of adenoma associated biomarkers is a promising technique to accommodate this need. The biomarker Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) is overexpressed in adenomatous colon tissue versus normal tissue and has proven to be a valid target for molecular imaging. The University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG) developed a fluorescent tracer by labeling the VEGF-targeting humanized monoclonal antibody bevacizumab, currently used in anti-cancer therapy, with the fluorescent dye IRDye800CW. The investigators hypothesize that when bevacizumab-IRDye800CW is administered to patients, it accumulates in VEGF expressing adenomas, enabling adenoma visualization using a newly developed near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence endoscopy platform (NL43407.042.13).

*Endoscopy study, the research intraoperative imaging device is adjusted for endoscopic use.